Welcome to The Child Golfer!

First, welcome!

Second, let me start by telling you this is not another blog all about junior golf instruction, raising a winning junior golfer, or the next Tiger Woods. This blog is about child golf for kids of all talent levels and parents of all types. I have seen a number of sites out there about junior golf equipment, instruction, and “success”, but I have not run across any help specifically for us parents, to teach us how to get started in child golf, and get into competitive kids golf.

Success will mean something different to different folks. Golf is a gift from you to your child and from your child to you. I also believe it is nearly impossible to predict what golf will become for any child as they grow into adults, but I can predict it is a gift they can enjoy forever. If through this site, you learn how to give the gift of golf to your child, and at the very least they become a golfer for life, and learn the sport, and enjoy the sport, then we will both have been successful. More than that is absolutely possible, and I believe you’ll set up a good chance for more here, but that will be icing on the cake far into the future!

You will find some good instruction on these pages, but it will be very practical for this age and from the perspective of a parent.

So, this blog is a forum to help you learn what to do as the parent of a child golfer. Most parents really don’t know what to do, especially when it comes to tournaments and such. I have seen the fear in many newbie Daddy Caddies at kids golf tournaments, and I was one of them a long time ago. I have also seen the amazing head scratching of “veteran” Daddy Caddies as they learn to deal with a nine year old golfer who is different than the eight year old they had on the last tour (and yes it’s the same kid!).

The Child Golfer is dedicated to helping parents, like us, who want to help their child golfer. We’re not talking about a fourteen year old golfer; we’ll call the twelve to eighteen year old golfer a “junior golfer”. By the time a junior golfer is twelve or so, they are pretty much on their own. In fact, if you have a twelve year old, you know they don’t want you to caddy for them. This site is dedicated to the child golfer. A child golfer can be as young as two or three years old and let’s say as old as eleven.

We call the parent of a child golfer “Daddy Caddy”. Now, all you Mommy Caddies out there, please don’t be offended, this site is for you too, but Mommy doesn’t rhyme with caddy, and, well, it is mostly daddies who caddy. But, please, make no mistake … Mommy Caddies are definitely out there and we love you, so please join in and consider this your home too. In many ways, mommies are better equipped to caddy than Daddies.

The parent of a child golfer can face A LOT of challenges. Believe me, I decided to start this blog after many, many times commiserating with Daddy Caddies after a tournament round with our child golfer. The ones on top of the leader board, the ones on the bottom of the leader board, no matter. After a round of golf with their child golfer, the Daddy Caddies could always use a bartender, a therapist, or both!

As parents of a child golfer from the age of three through ten now, we have seen, felt, and learned a lot. We hope this blog becomes a forum for Daddy Caddies to get together and ask questions, share knowledge and experience, and learn too. Like kids, parents are all different. We’ll take an honest look at parents in child golf and how different our different personalities come into play. We love what golf has meant to our son and in our small way here, we hope to promote the sport just a little.

We want to share insights and stimulate thought about all the hats the parent of a child golfer must wear. Just a little insight and you’ll see, it’s much harder to caddy for a five year old than for a golf touring pro like Tiger Woods or Bubba Watson. We’ll have discussions to help the new parent with:

  • how to get your child started in child golf,
  • practical info kids’ golf equipment,
  • golf teaching pros for kids,
  • child golf tournaments
  • techniques during play,
  • being a parent and managing your child during a round,
  • managing yourself, your spectator spouse, siblings,
  • child golf competition,
  • the rules of golf, etiquette, situations,
  • and much more.

There is a lot. That’s why we hope this blog  can be useful.

Please spread the word to Daddy Caddies you may know. They will immediately connect. If they are working with their child golfer, they “get it”. Tell them either blog.childgolfer.com or DaddyCaddy.net … either will get you here (note the .net on DaddyCaddy.net).

This is my first post just to welcome you. I will kick off some topics very shortly, but, if you happen to stumble in here, feel free to post a question or comment about your experience and I will respond; and you’ll help get things rolling by doing so.

I will close with a little background. Our son is now ten years old. He started playing golf in an after-school enrichment program when he was barely three. I’m talking the famous plastic clubs, Mr. Wood, Mr. Iron, and Mr. Putter. He has been competing in tournaments since he was six and has played in nearly 150 tournaments. I don’t mind saying, he is not apparently the next Tiger Woods. However, he is pretty good. Lately he’s enjoyed some success as Player of the Year on a tour here in South Florida with US Kids Golf, and shoots frequently in the thirties and averages about a 42 for nine holes at over 2200 yards.

I am an electrical engineer with an MBA and consider myself a student of the golf swing. I am a high handicapper myself (and working to improve), but you will see that the golf swing is much easier to observe and understand than perform correctly about 80 times in a row for 18 holes. I will also share that, as a technical executive, we always learn the most when there are problems to fix. When everything goes great, things go great, so there is little opportunity to learn. But have a problem, and you’ll learn the most through troubleshooting. I believe this actually better qualifies me for sharing learning experiences than if everything was no problem. Further, we had no real history with golf. We learned everything from scratch. Many child golfers are fortunate to come from a golf or country club background and we’ve met many very very nice people who do. We hope to especially help the newbies, like we were. However, we know there will be some help here for the country club folks too; they are just kids after all.

So the “naturals” out there do the best a lot of times, but it’s easy to get a diamond from a diamond. More common are “regular” kids. The ones who are just kids, who perhaps don’t have that super natural focus at seven. The ones who, in the middle of a tournament, break away to go chasing a duck!. We love them with all of our heart and frankly prefer that in the big picture over laser focus at this age ’cause their freedom to break off and chase that duck will pass sooner than we like. We pray he always takes a moment to chase that duck.

Making a diamond from coal is a much more qualifying experience; and frankly incredibly rewarding. I don’t mean my son was coal, he wasn’t at all, but that just how words will have it. I learned A LOT by facing the challenges of him being just a talented regular kid, and not a “natural”. It’s all relative, but I assure that is the norm. Just good regular eight year olds, trying to learn golf, and how to play in tournaments. Most importantly, regular parents trying to learn the same with them AND how to keep their own self together out there!

Welcome to The Child Golfer. Perhaps consider this that bartender and therapist in digital form here as a blog. We are looking forward to meeting you all here and sincerely welcome you to the world of child golf.

2 thoughts on “Welcome to The Child Golfer!

    • Hi Bryan,
      Thanks for connecting. We know every parent who caddies for their child golfer can relate, don’t we? I hope you’ll share some of your insights some time. All the best!
      Terry

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